INTERACTIONS BETWEEN MICROBIOTA AND THE TELEOST IMMUNE SYSTEM IN HEALTH AND DISEASE

14 Jun 2017
11:45 - 12:00

INTERACTIONS BETWEEN MICROBIOTA AND THE TELEOST IMMUNE SYSTEM IN HEALTH AND DISEASE

Irene Salinas, University of New Mexico

Irene Salinas

Center for Evolutionary and Theoretical Immunology, Department of Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM

The microbial communities that live at the mucosal surfaces of all animals create one of the most ancient and successful symbiotic partnerships found in nature. Shifts in the environment or the host as well as pathogen infection alter the delicate balance between microbiota and host mucosal surfaces. Recent deep-sequencing surveys have untapped the diversity of the bacterial microbiota of a number of fish species. However, how symbiont populations are maintained by the fish host is still poorly understood. Here. I will summarize the known mechanisms by which symbionts are recognized by the rainbow trout immune system under homeostatic conditions. I will present our latest results regarding the interactions between fish symbiotic bacteria and the mucosal immune system, with a focus on the trout secretory component. I will also give examples on how symbiont metabolites such as sphingolipids directly orchestrate mucosal antibody and B cell responses. Finally, I will give some examples on how the Atlantic salmon host-microbiota interactions are perturbed in the skin during the course of a viral infection. Our results take us a step closer to understanding the complex co-evolutionary processes that shape the partnership between microbiota and vertebrate mucosal surfaces.